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#PSTip How to configure storage quotas for a mailbox using PowerShell

Note: This tip requires PowerShell 2.0 or above.

Exchange lets us configure mailbox storage quotas for a mailbox, control the size of mailboxes and manage the growth of mailbox databases. Storage quotas can be configured on a per-database basis or explicitly on a mailbox level. When a mailbox size reaches or exceeds a specified storage quota limit, Exchange sends a descriptive notification to the mailbox owner.

We can set storage quota limits for the following fields:

  • Issue warning at (KB) : Specifies the maximum storage limit in kilobytes (KB) before a warning is issued to the mailbox user. The value range is from 0 through 2,147,483,647 KB. If the mailbox size reaches or exceeds the value specified, Exchange sends a warning message to the mailbox user.
  • Prohibit send at (KB) : Specifies a prohibit send limit in KB for the mailbox. The value range is from 0 through 2,147,483,647 KB. If the mailbox size reaches or exceeds the specified limit, Exchange prevents the mailbox user from sending new messages and displays a descriptive error message.
  • Prohibit send and receive at (KB) : Specifies a prohibit send and receive limit in KB for the mailbox. The value range is from 0 through 2,147,483,647 KB. If the mailbox size reaches or exceeds the specified limit, Exchange prevents the mailbox user from sending new messages and won’t deliver any new messages to the mailbox. Any messages sent to the mailbox are returned to the sender with a descriptive error message.

To set these limits explicitly on a mailbox object, use the Set-Mailbox cmdlet. Launch the Exchange Management Console (EMC) and type the following command:

Set-Mailbox -Identity jsmith -IssueWarningQuota 1.7 -ProhibitSendQuota 1.9gb -ProhibitSendReceiveQuota 2gb -UseDatabaseQuotaDefaults $false
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